November 11, 2015

My 60-Hour Marathon of Medical Innovation

Event Recaps: BioOhio Annual Conference & the Cleveland Clinic Medical Innovation Summit

I spent the last week of October in Cleveland, near my hometown, attending the BioOhio Annual Conference and the Cleveland Clinic Medical Innovation Summit held in at the gorgeous, new Global Center for Health Innovation. Being surrounded by such brilliant clinical and scientific minds was both inspiring and humbling, and here is the cliff notes version of my experience in the #CLE.

Throughout the two conferences there were 3 trends:

Patient Adherence

Monday kicked off with the BioOhio Annual conference, which was beautifully put together by John Lewis, Jen Goldsberry, and Drew Cook at BioOhio. Throughout the day we heard Ohio success stories such as Don Wetherhold, CEO of Aprecia Pharmaceuticals, who received FDA approval for the first-ever 3D printed drug.

Aprecia is addressing a need in the market using their 3D manufacturing process; their ZipDose formula disintegrates in an instant with a sip of liquid and for elderly as well as young children, this is increasing adherence to previously missed medications.

New Technologies are Helping Physicians Generate Better Patient Outcomes

We then heard from CEO of Assurex Health, Virginia Drosos, whose company has doubled its workforce to 365 people within the last year and was named 2015 Cincinnati Business of the Year. Their product, GeneSight, is genetic test that provides physicians with a greater understanding of which medicines will be the most effective for their patients on an individual level. Assurex is working to eliminate the need for a trial-and-error prescription period – with the evolution of technology, the physician is now equipped with not just more information, but more accurate, to aid them in making their recommendation.

Lunch on Tuesday at the Cleveland Clinic Medical Innovation Summit provided another engaging discussion on technology with Michael Rhodin of IBM, who spoke about the healthcare applications of their innovative technology, Watson. Turns out it can do more than just win on Jeopardy; it can scan millions of pages of medical journals in seconds to assist doctors with diagnosis and treatments at the bedside. With how quickly medical information, studies and journals are being published today, it is nearly impossible for physicians to keep up on the latest data, but fear not, our dear friend Watson can! Watson can then parse it into actionable advice.

The Future is Bright

To conclude the summit, the Cleveland Clinic presented on the Top 10 Medical Innovations we will see in 2016.

Well over half the sessions, as well as the Top 10 Innovations, were focused on breakthrough treatments in development that are changing the face of healthcare, medical devices, diagnostics, and pharmaceuticals. An area of interest for me was the application of robotic prosthetics, controlled with the mind, move just like limbs. There was also discussion on fast tracking vaccines in response to public health epidemics and gene editing to wipe out serious genetic diseases. These innovations make what seemed to be something written in a Sci-Fi novel even just five years ago, is now a reality. It makes me think about what we will be discussing at the Cleveland Clinic Medical Innovation Summit in 2020!

Both conferences represented trends in the market that cannot be ignored and are taking over headlines in the healthcare and life science industries. The Cleveland Clinic and BioOhio are bringing the future of medicine to the City of Cleveland, and the Clinic’s continued work to be not just a leader, but THE leader, is evident in their ability to bring these brilliant minds together for a 60-hour marathon of innovation.

See you next year!

Tags: executive & professional search, conferences, pharma / biotech

Author
Shawn Kerek

Shawn is a Director at Taylor Strategy Partners within the Executive and Professional Search practice. Shawn helps clients build their culture by bringing the right people to their organization and aids candidates finding a new organization they can call home. In his past lives he has worked at other recruiting organizations, helping find and deliver a variety of people such as Physical Therapists, Software Developers, and Industrial Engineers. When he is not at work he enjoys wrestling with his two large Labrador Retrievers, Hank and Lucy, exercising and obsessively tracking everything he eats except dark chocolate, and last but certainly not least, reading up on the latest Sci-Fi novels.

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